An Indiana measure would create a registry for some physicians, nurses, individuals and caregivers to treat intractable epilepsy with cannabidiol and permit pharmacies to dispense it. Pictured: A dose of Colorado-made cannabidiol oil is measured by a parent preparing to give CBD oil to her child as part of a regimented treatment for seizures in July 2014. (Joe Amon, Denver Post file)

Indiana CBD oil measure moves ahead

The bill would authorize the use of cannabidiol as a treatment for epilepsy

INDIANAPOLIS — An Indiana measure that would allow some epileptic people to be treated with oil derived from cannabis plants has cleared the state Senate.

Indiana is among the last states to forbid even the issue of marijuana extracts that are low in THC and high in cannabidiol, or CBD, the compound that studies suggest may help reduce epileptic seizures.

The measure creates a registry for some physicians, nurses, individuals and caregivers to treat intractable epilepsy with cannabidiol and permits pharmacies to dispense it. The Senate has sent it to the House for consideration.

An amendment to the bill replaced references to “hemp oil” with cannabidiol. The measure defines cannabidiol as a plant extract or mixture containing less than 0.3 percent THC, at least 5 percent CBD and no other controlled substance.