A sample of White Fire OG from Colorado marijuana shop Kind Love in Glendale. (Sohum Shah, The Cannabist)

White Fire OG (marijuana review)

Be ready for some heavy-duty chill time with WiFi OG — it provided effective pain relief for a bike injury but proved slightly debilitating

Colorado has experienced some of the largest population growth of any state in the country over the last few years. Some of these new Coloradans moved here for our more progressive approach to cannabis. More likely, many moved here for the thriving economy and plethora of outdoor activities.

I love snowboarding and camping and going to the park like most Coloradans, but I rarely get out on a bicycle. I haven’t even owned one since I forgot where I locked mine on campus as a freshman at CU Boulder. Every once in a while, though, I’ll borrow a friend’s bike to go on a ride.

On a Sunday afternoon after a rec soccer game, my buddy Matty and I decided to bike the hilly Highlands west of downtown and meet some friends for a bite at Avanti. My lack of biking experience meant I didn’t give a second thought to wearing flip-flops.

On the way back, my sandal got caught in the pedal at a stop sign and I fell on my side. It didn’t hurt at first, but when I got home a couple of hours later, my arm was sporting a “swellbow” the size of an orange. Thankfully it wasn’t fractured, but it hurt. A lot. By the second day, I felt random surges of shooting pain along the back of my elbow.

That evening my elbow flared up during a drive across town, so I decided to make a pit stop for some pain reliever. It was around 9 p.m., so I took a detour through Glendale, where recreational shops are allowed to stay open until midnight. I had recently rediscovered Kind Love (after almost six years) and was impressed with their flower selection.

White Fire OG by the numbers: $14/gram, $275/ounce (recreational), at Kind Love, 4380 E. Alameda Ave. in Glendale (southeast Denver)

I asked the budtender for a heavy indica that would help relieve the pain in my bandaged arm — an extremely rare request for a loyal sativa-smoker like myself. He recommended the White Fire OG (a.k.a. WiFi OG) as a solid pain reliever that wouldn’t kill daytime productivity. I figured this would be the perfect strain to get through my never-ending flow of computer-based work without the consistent pain in my elbow. After deciding on a gram of flower, I picked a gram of wax as well — in case the flower wasn’t enough for my pain.

When I got home, I gave the wax a shot. The dabs hit the spot, so I saved the flower until the weekend.


Saturday evening, I headed over to Capitol Hill to shoot my first-ever video review with DPtv and Cannabist Show producer Vince (if you’ve heard the podcast, you know him well).

I sat down to roll up a joint. But first, the visual inspection: This cut of WiFi OG featured a light shade of green throughout, with sporadic clusters of burnt orange hairs. When I looked at it closer, I noticed it actually had a darker shade of olive green throughout that was almost completely covered in frosty white trichomes, like a blanket of fresh powder covering the front lawn — clearly the characteristics of The White genetics in the strain. The pointy calyx structure, on the other hand, was more likely the product of the ChemDog genetics (via OG Kush).

Here’s the basic info about White Fire OG lineage: It’s a cross of a male The White plant and female Fire OG Kush, bred by OG Raskal Genetics. According to Seedfinder, The White is a three-way cross bred by a breeder named Krome in California that gets its name from the blanket of trichomes that cover the nug. It is a clone-only strain that has been passed around Cali grower circles. Seedfinder says Fire [OG] Kush is likely a “fire cut” (potent phenotype) of OG Kush. The progeny of these two strains present a number of different White Fire OG phenos — some are bushy and stocky, while others are more narrow and pointy.

Kind Love’s WiFi OG structure definitely looked like the latter. It had a very sour, chemical smell with hints of pine and earth, again likely the product of the OG genetics.

Initially, the sour taste was overpowered by an almost berry-like sweetness. By the time I got halfway into the j, the sweetness was dominated by a combination of pine and earth that created a tingle on the tip of my tongue.

The sharp pain in my swellbow faded within minutes. The relief was accompanied by a floating sensation in my head that made me feel like it was filled with helium. Vince asked me what I wanted to do, and I told him I wouldn’t mind taking a walk or going to the park. The fluorescent lights were a little too intense for my stoned eyes, so we took a break from filming. But instead of any doing any activity, I zoned out in the apartment.

About 20 minutes later, the pain relief was still great (and appreciated) but I started to lose mental focus and felt a lot more relaxed. We decided to give the recording another go. Once I sat back down under the now-dimmer lights, I knew I was really high. The lights seemed to be blinking at me and I struggled to speak for more than a minute or two about what the high was like.

The balloon-headed sensation was much stronger now, but it couldn’t distract me from the warm, pleasant feeling in my injured arm. Producer Vince revisited his question — “What do you wanna do?” I definitely didn’t feel like going to the park anymore. I wanted to sit and watch TV or a movie.

And that’s exactly what we did. The latest addition to the “Jurassic Park” series was on.

Over the next few days, the pain relief from WiFi OG helped immensely as the swelling in my arm started to go down — although I made damn sure to save it for an evening smoke. Kind Love’s budtender apparently had a different definition of “daytime productivity” than me. The strain was almost like a narcotic pill: an effective painkiller but slightly debilitating.

The White Fire OG didn’t produce the electrifying, energetic high that the nickname “WiFi” may imply, but I plan to keep some in my arsenal to burn down any future injury-induced pain I may experience.