Dosing edibles in Colorado's young marijuana market is an inexact science. (Kathryn Scott Osler, The Denver Post)

Get educated about edibles: Eight tips for getting right dose

5. Different brands, different consistency: “Some people have a different reaction or experience with infused chocolates or infused gummies, and one will often work better than the other for somebody,” said Giddy Up. “It ties into the comparison with the (marijuana) flower. If people find a strain they like, they go with that strain — or they might find a dispensary they prefer because of the growers there. It’s the same with edibles: If somebody finds an edible they really enjoy, and it’s a 10-milligram gummy and it’s consistent with the dosage and they know how their body will react and how they’ll react psychologically, it becomes their go-to brand.” So experiment with different brands. Again, ask your budtender and friends. Do your research.

6. The waiting game: “For casual users, people who don’t have high tolerances, 10-20 milligrams should be more than enough,” said Incredibles’ Eschino. “10 milligrams is the recommended serving size from the (Marijuana Enforcement Division). It’s a good place to start, especially with edibles, because you don’t wanna take too much. So start slow, and wait 45 minutes after you take it to see how you feel. You can always take more — but you can’t go back and take less.” And some edibles take longer than 45 minutes to kick in. Colorado edible brand Dixie Elixirs includes an Activation Time on each of its products — a smart graphic on the packaging that tells consumers how long they should wait before taking more. “Marijuana infused products can take 30 minutes to 2 hours to take effect,” says Dixie’s clever Marijuana 101 promotional pamphlet. “So take your time, because overindulging is not fun.”

7. Expect a different high: “I only eat edibles when I know I’m Ubering,” said Giddy Up, referencing the high-end taxi alternative. Giddy Up calls himself “an intense, heavy smoker who smokes on average a gram and a half to two grams of concentrate per day.” That’s a gargantuan amount of concentrate, and yet “a heavy smoker like myself is still an edible weakling,” he continued. “A lot of the reason why the ride is so intense in edibles is because of the minimal amount of membranes it passes through in the stomach. It doesn’t absorb the same way as smoking through the lungs.” So if you think your pot-smoking tolerance has prepped you for higher-milligram usage in edibles, think again.

8. No mandatory THC testing: “Right now testing the product is permissive,” Colorado Department of Revenue communications director Daria Serna told us in March. “Starting in May 2014, it could become mandatory for MIPs to test every production batch of edibles for potency.” In plain text: Companies making marijuana-infused edibles in Colorado right now are not required to test their product. We did an extensive panel of tests on 10 different MIPs (marijuana-infused products) and saw just how wildly the amounts of THC claimed on the labels are off. Dr. J’s claimed 100 milligrams of activated THC in its winter mint chocolate Star Barz when it only contained .3 milligrams. Incredibles’ product had the opposite results, testing at 146 milligrams of THC on its Mile High Mint bar labeled for 100 milligrams. (See all the testing results.) This is a buyer-beware situation that emphasizes the importance of finding a brand and a product that works for you and sticking with it.